8 Common Salt Water Hot Tub Questions Answered

If you recently switched from a chlorine hot tub to a salt water hot tub, you will discover that most of the things you learned about running your regular chlorine hot tub wouldn’t be very useful when it comes to running your salt water hot tub.

So it’s not unusual to find yourself needing answers to some common salt water hot tub questions.

But not to worry, this post will provide answers to 8 common salt water hot tub questions that might be bugging you. So let’s dive in.

Here are 8 most common salt water hot tub questions answered

How Often Should You Add Salt to a Salt Water Hot Tub?

You should add salt to your salt water hot tub when you drain and refill the salt water hot tub. This is because it takes a while for the salt in the water to be used up completely. So you wouldn’t need to add salt again till the next time you drain and refill the salt water hot tub.

How Often Should You Add Salt to a Salt Water Hot Tub?

The salt cell chlorinator in your salt water hot tub converts salt to chlorine to disinfect your hot tub. The salt that is added takes weeks to be completely used up. This means you get weeks of a continual supply of chlorine in the hot tub without needing to add salt again.

You will be happy to know that you don’t even need much salt in the salt water hot tub. Most salt water hot tubs require only 2 pounds of salt for every 100 gallons of water, so if you have a 400-gallon hot tub, you only need 8 pounds of salt at an interval of at least 5 months. This shows you how cost-effective salt water hot tubs are.

Another alternative to know when you need to add salt to your hot tub is to check the chlorinator display screen. If you have a salt cell chlorinator that has a salt indicator, the display screen of the chlorinator will indicate when the chlorinator is low on salt and needs a refill.

Related: How To Clean Salt Water Hot Tubs?

What Temperature Do I Need to Use for My Salt Water Hot Tub?

You can set the temperature of your salt water hot tub between 100 degrees Fahrenheit (37 degrees Celsius) and 104 degrees Fahrenheit (40 degrees Celsius).

What Temperature Do I Need to Use for My Salt Water Hot Tub?

If you just transitioned from a chlorine hot tub to a salt water hot tub, one thing that doesn’t change is the temperature at which you run your hot tub. You can run your salt water hot tub at the same water temperature as you did with the chlorine hot tub.

If you are new to this, you can change the water temperature of your salt water hot tub using the control panel. Alternate between different water temperatures till you find the one that suits you. Most hot tubs are run at 102 degrees Fahrenheit (38.8 degrees Celsius). That water temperature might work for you too.

The water temperature that you choose will depend on your personal preference and not the salt water hot tub. Hot tubs are usually run between 95 degrees Fahrenheit and 104 degrees Fahrenheit. Most hot tubs either salt water or chlorine hot tubs wouldn’t go beyond 104 degrees Fahrenheit because water temperature more than 104 degrees Fahrenheit is too hot for you to soak in.

Should You Shower After Using a Salt Water Hot Tub?

You should always shower after using a salt water hot tub. Though salt water hot tubs don’t use chemicals, there is usually still chlorine and some contaminants in the water. So, always take a shower after using a salt water hot tub.

Salt water hot tubs are famous for their low chemical needs. Many users believe that they don’t need to take a shower after using their salt water hot tubs because they aren’t at risk of any chemicals on the skin.

Though salt water hot tubs don’t require as many chemicals as regular chlorine hot tubs, there is usually still chlorine in the water. Not to mention the other contaminants that fall into the water especially if the salt water hot tub is used by more than one person.

These contaminants and hot tub salt (chlorine) can cause itchiness and rash. So you should always take a shower after using your salt water hot tub to wash off any chlorine or contaminant that you picked up while using the spa.

You should also shower before using the hot tub to prevent a build-up of scum from your body in the water. The sweat from your body, body care products, skin cells, perfumes, and the likes can all contaminate your salt water hot tub water. You should take a shower before getting in the hot tub so you don’t introduce these contaminants into the water.

Related: Salt vs Chlorine Hot Tubs

What if I Put Too Much Salt in My Hot Tub?

If you put too much salt in your salt water hot tub, you need to lower the salt level by diluting the water. You will have to drain part of the water in the hot tub and top up the remaining water with fresh water. This will dilute the water and lower the salt level.

It’s not unusual to add too much salt to a salt water hot tub. But if you do, you need to lower the salt levels. Having a salt water hot tub with a high salt level (or a salt level more than 3000 PPM) will damage the hot tub in the long run by causing corrosion and foaming in the hot tub.

If you noticed that you added too much salt in the hot tub, you should test for the salt level in the water first using your hot tub test strips. If the salt level is over 3000 PPM, you need to dilute the water. But so much goes into diluting the water than just adding freshwater.

Luckily, I covered everything you need to know about lowering the salt level in your salt water hot tub in a recent topic. Did you know you can even have a high salt level in your hot tub even if you don’t add too much salt? I’m sure you didn’t. Just click this link to read the post.

Related: Tips on Converting to a Salt Water Hot Tub

What Kind of Salt Can I Use in My Hot Tub?

You should use salt that is advertised or branded as hot tub salt in your salt water hot tub. You should look for hot tub salt that is at least 99.8% pure, evaporated, not iodized, and has no additives. This is the best type of salt to use in your salt water hot tub.

You should never use common table salt, rock salt, or ice salt in your hot tub. These types of salts usually have anti-caking compounds and have been processed for specific uses.

Using them in your salt water hot tub will cause the water chemistry to go wonky. Not to mention the damages these salt types can cause to your hot tub’s working parts and your skin too.

Do Salt Systems Require Less Maintenance?

Salt systems require less maintenance because you get to spend less time calculating and adjusting the water chemistry and sanitizer levels. Salt systems are also easier to maintain because you don’t need to drain and clean them as much as you would a regular chlorine hot tub.

Salt water hot tubs are very popular for their low-maintenance needs. Salt systems are more stable than regular chlorine hot tubs so you don’t need chemicals to run them. Salt water hot tubs are designed with a chlorinator that helps to convert hot tub salt to chlorine through electrolysis.

The chlorine generated by the chlorinator acts as the sanitizer in the water. This eliminates any need for the user to worry about what chemicals to add or the amount of chemicals to add to the water. All you need is hot tub salt and the chlorinator takes care of the rest.

The absence of chemicals in the water also means you can use the salt water hot tub for an extended period of up to a year before you need to drain the water.

You also get to worry less about clogged plumbing lines, biofilm in the water, unbalanced water chemistry, and the likes. This is because the additives and foreign substances that are added to hot tub chemicals during production don’t get into your salt water hot tub since you don’t use any chemicals.

When you take into consideration all of these benefits, it’s no wonder why many hot tub users prefer to switch from the heavy maintenance chlorine hot tubs to the low maintenance salt system hot tubs.

Will the Salt Water Corrode My Hot Tub Pipes?

The salt water will not corrode your hot tub pipes except there is a very high salt level in the water. Salt water hot tubs usually have a salt level between 1500 PPM and 3000 PPM. This salt level is not enough to cause corrosion of hot tub pipes.

A common misconception about salt water hot tubs is that they cause corrosion because of the presence of salt as a sanitizer. The hot tub salt that you add to the salt water doesn’t cause corrosion.

Corrosion only occurs when the salt level in the hot tub is way above the recommended range. You need to have at least 3500 PPM of salt level in your hot tub before corrosion can begin to occur in the hot tub plumbing. Seeing as how most salt water hot tubs have a salt level below 3000 PPM, it’s almost impossible for the salt water in your hot tub to cause corrosion.

Salt water hot tub owners that have witnessed corrosion in their hot tubs often experience damages after adding a heavy dose of salt to the hot tub water.

Corrosion can also occur if you use the wrong salt in your hot tub. So to put it in clearer terms, the salt water in your hot tub will only cause corrosion if the salt level gets very high (above 3500 PPM) or if you use the wrong type of salt in the water.

Will Salt Water Hot Tubs Fade My Swimsuit?

Salt water hot tubs can fade your swimsuits if you use the swimsuits in the salt water constantly over a long period. The combination of chlorine and hot water in the spa will eventually cause your swimsuit to fade.

To be fair, all hot tubs will fade your swimsuit eventually. Regardless of if you have an inflatable hot tub or a salt water hot tub, your swimsuits will eventually fade. This is because you use the swimsuits in hot water that is over 100 degrees Fahrenheit (or 37 degrees Celsius). Not to mention the presence of several chemicals in the water.

The combination of hot tub chemicals, hot water, sweat, and several other contaminants will cause your swimsuit to fade eventually. In a salt water hot tub, it’s the combination the hot water and chlorine that eventually causes the swimsuits to fade.

Final Words

Overall, running a salt water hot tub correctly might prove difficult. But I hope the questions and answers above make the task easier for you.

If you have any other salt water hot tub question that is bugging you, feel free to ask below in the comment section and I’ll answer it as soon as possible.

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